FAQ: How much more electricity will I use if I drive an electric car?

Driving an electric vehicle is an efficient way to get around, both in terms of energy and money. DriveElectricVT estimates that the cost to drive an electric vehicle—either all-electric or a plug-in hybrid—is equivalent to driving a gasoline car if gas is running at about $1 per gallon. And the cost for electricity is a lot more stable over time than the cost of gasoline.

If you are thinking about driving on electricity now or in the relatively near future, you may wonder about covering your electric vehicle’s needs with solar. The average American driver drives 13,476 miles per year, according to the Federal Highway Administration. An electric vehicle uses around 1/3rd of a kWh to drive 1 mile. That means to drive the average distance of 13,476 miles in a year, the car will go through 4,463 kWh. This is roughly 2/3rds to 3/4ths of the electric output of one Solaflect PV Tracker in Vermont or New Hampshire, depending on the Tracker’s location.

See more FAQs here, or quickly jump to electric use by heat pumps or household appliances.

$1,000 incentive for Vermont electric cars

DriveElectricVT announces

New electric vehicle incentives available to Vermonters

We’re offering up to $1,000 on qualifying plug-in vehicles!

For those in the market for a new car this summer, now is the time to go electric. For a limited time only, we are offering an instant discount off the purchase or lease of a new plug-in vehicle. There are approximately 200 incentives available to Vermonters, so it pays to act fast!

[Full announcement…]

FAQ: Can I mow under the Tracker?

Yes, you can mow under your Tracker. Your working space under the Tracker will depend on the time of day and day of year. That’s because the panels are tilted to face directly at the sun, and as the sun travels the tilt of the panels changes. As a result, the amount of space underneath the lowest edge of the panels changes.

When the Tracker is in the vertical position before sunrise and after sunset, the bottom edge of the panels is approximately 4 ft above the ground. You could easily mow under that with a push mower, but you’d risk collision if you were using a riding mower.

Of course, most mowing occurs during the day. On the Spring and Autumn equinoxes (on or about March and September 20th), the Tracker is tilted enough that the clearance beneath the panels is 5 ft or more from about 10:15 am through 3:45 pm. By Summer Solstice, you’ve got 5 ft or more of clearance from about 8:30 am through 5:15 pm.

See more FAQs here.

We can do it: Portugal’s grid runs 4 days straight on only renewables

Climate news is generally dire, but real progress is possible. In fact, it is happening. The latest proof is Portugal’s new record for renewable energy supply: 4 straight days where 100 percent of its power came from renewables.

As renewable energy matures into an ever more popular and cost-effective source of electricity, we’re getting used to seeing some historic achievements from nations that have ramped up their clean energy infrastructure – and the latest glory goes to Portugal.

Recent figures show that the country ran on renewable energy alone for four days straight this month, completing an extraordinary 107-hour run between Saturday morning, May 7, and early Wednesday evening, May 11. During this record-setting window, Portugal ran on solar, wind, and hydro electricity entirely, without needing to fall back on power sourced from its coal and natural gas plants.

Full article.

New Hampshire re-opens net metering!

 

Governor Hassan signed the net-metering cap increase bill into law on Monday, May 2. Customers of Eversource, Liberty Utility, and Unitil can once again go solar. (Those with New Hampshire Electric Coop were not limited by the state’s previous cap, and continue to be able to go solar.)

The new limit on net metering is supposed to provide enough capacity for those who want to go solar this year. However, as happened in both NH and Vermont last year, the available cap easily could be hit sooner than expected. In other words, if you put off your decision to go solar until late in the year, you may find yourself out of luck and prevented from doing so by the new limit. Don’t delay! Contact us for a site visit today.

10th LEAP Energy Fair, Saturday, April 9, 2016

10th LEAP ENERGY FAIR
Saturday, April 9, 2016

9 AM – 3 PM    Event is FREE
Crossett Brook Middle School Gym, Duxbury, VT  (5672 VT Route 100)

TOUR 75 exhibits and talk with dozens of experts about solar power, heat pumps, weatherization, energy audits, geothermal, biomass, pellet stoves, electric vehicles, and much more

LEARN how to reduce fuel bills, save energy and shrink emissions

PARTICIPATE  in break-out discussions on: Sustainable Transportation; Air & Ground Source Heat Pumps; Going Solar; and Weatherization.

KIDS can enjoy a free show by Marko the Magician at 11AM

FREE electronics recycling onsite

Hosted by the volunteers of Waterbury LEAP.  Visit www.waterburyleap.org for more details.

NH House passes net metering increase

If you are in New Hampshire with Liberty, Eversource (formerly PSNH) or Unitil as your utility and have been waiting to go solar, you don’t need to wait hardly any longer. A friend in Concord writes, “The House just passed HB 1116 to expand net metering and to transfer regulation of the solar energy contribution to our state’s energy resources to the PUC. It was a strong voice vote. The same language has now been passed in the House and the Senate. Soon the House bill or the Senate bill will be passed through both houses and go to the governor for signing.”

You can track the bill’s status here, and read the text here.

FAQ: How does solar production vary over the year?

Aka, take a ride on the Solar Coaster!

The amount of electricity generated by a PV Tracker varies greatly from month to month. Days in December (in Vermont and New Hampshire) are much shorter than in June. In December, each day lasts only about 9 hours. In June, each day lasts more than 15¼ hours, 70 percent longer than December’s day length. Read more